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Key dates for Employment law

2021

January

  1. Brexit - Photo

    Brexit – employment rights

    Under the EU trade and co-operation agreement the UK must not weaken or reduce the level of employment rights in place as at 31 December in a manner affecting trade or investment.

    Essential Reading: Our Insight

February

  1. Publication of information - Icon

    Publication of CJRS claims

    HMRC will start publishing details of employers’ CJRS claims.  The published information will include the employer name, an indication of the value of the claim within a banded range and the company number.

  2. Government consultation - Photo

    Government consultation - post termination non-compete clauses

    BEIS consultation on proposals to reform post-termination non-compete clauses closed.

     

    Essential Reading: Our Insight
  3. Government consultation - Icon

    Government consultation - ban on exclusivity clauses

    BEIS consultation on extending the ban on working elsewhere beyond low-paid workers closed.

    Essential Reading: Our Insight

April

  1. Gender Pay - Icon

    Gender pay gap reporting

    Reporting will go ahead this year, but EHRC will not take enforcement action until October 2021.

    Essential Reading: Our Insight
  2. Minimum wage - Icon

    Minimum wage

    Increases to the national minimum wage and national living wage come into effect.  Age 23+: £8.91; age 21-22: £8.36; age 18-20: £6.56; age 16-17: £4.62; apprentice rate: £4.30.

  3. Off-payroll workers - Photo

    Off-payroll workers/IR35

    There are changes to the off-roll working rules for medium and large businesses that engage contractors through personal service companies (PSC).  Broadly, the client organisation or fee payer will become responsible for the contractor’s tax and NICs rather than the PSC.

    Essential Reading: Our Insight

June

  1. In court - Icon

    In court: Holiday pay – overtime

    The Supreme Court is due to hear an appeal against a decision that holiday pay must include regular voluntary/non-guaranteed overtime. (Flowers v East of England Ambulance Trust)

  2. In court - Image

    In court: Holiday pay – series of deductions

    The Supreme Court is due to hear an appeal against the decision that a “series” of unlawful deductions from holiday pay would not be interrupted by gaps of more than three months. (Chief Constable of Northern Ireland v Agnew)

July

  1. Fask Mask - Icon

    Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme

    This is has been extended to September, but in July employers will have to contribute 10% of the furlough costs.

August

  1. Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme - Photo

    Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme

    This is has been extended to September, but in August and September employers will have to contribute 20% of the furlough costs.

November

  1. In court - Icon

    In court: Holiday pay – part year workers

    The Supreme Court is due to hear an appeal on a decision that an employment tribunal was wrong to find that “part-year” permanent workers should have their annual leave entitlement capped at 12.07% of annualised hours (Harper Trust v Brazel).

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